1. TWO BOSSY DAMES LINK ROUND-UP for September 11th, 2014:

    1. Inspired by The Replacements’ return to TV: Big Star’s chiming, sadly beautiful September Gurls
    2. beatonna's 's drawings of “wee” historical figures are painfully endearing: http://buff.ly/YPUsfA
    3. Eric Talmadge’s Instagram: a humanizing peek behind North Korea’s Iron Curtain. 
    4. The wonderful Gene Demby of nprcodeswitch goes long on the history of “dangerous” street fashion, drawing a line from the sagging pants panic of today to Los Angeles’s zoot suit riots of the 40s:  
    5. Sasariri’s bento boxes of every prefecture in Japan. Cute AND scrumptious!
    6. Lowell’s debut full-length, WE LOVER HER DEARLY, has been absolutely making our week. You can find it on Spotify, buy it from Arts & Crafts, or check out the official video for its lead single RIGHT! HERE! 
    7. As if we could resist sharing doyourememberonline's tale of how ur-cozy mystery Murder, She Wrote was born!  
    8. Brief & moving: Astronaut Frank Culbertson’s experience being the only American not on Earth during the September 11th attacks:
    9. A perfect back-to-school pairing: Dear America and lavish cussing, courtesy of assholedisney:
    10. This beautiful piece from roxanegay on abuse, all our sad stories, & what “lucky” means to most women:
    11. The shameful hidden epidemic of LGBT youth cut off by their religious families:
    12. And finally, annehelen's fascinating look at why we swipe the way we swipe on Tinder:
    13. BONUS DAMES CONTENT! The header material for this post: The inimitable janellemonae!! On Sesame Street! Telling you to keep working for your dreams! Truly, it’s what everyone needs to hear just about every day. 
  2. usnatarchives:

This photo is titled “Riveter at Lockheed Aircraft Corp., Burbank, CA”. The women pictured is donning a headscarf, similar to the one cultural icon “Rosie the Riveter” wears. “Rosie the Riveter” became a powerful symbol of feminism for women working in factories producing munitions and war supplies. National Archives Identifier: 522880

I would really, really like to learn how to tie a headscarf in my hair like this. 

    usnatarchives:

    This photo is titled “Riveter at Lockheed Aircraft Corp., Burbank, CA”. The women pictured is donning a headscarf, similar to the one cultural icon “Rosie the Riveter” wears. “Rosie the Riveter” became a powerful symbol of feminism for women working in factories producing munitions and war supplies. National Archives Identifier: 522880

    I would really, really like to learn how to tie a headscarf in my hair like this. 

    Reblogged from: metaquarry
  3. slaughterhouse90210:

“Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.”― Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

    slaughterhouse90210:

    “Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.”
    ― Jane Austen,
    Pride and Prejudice

    Reblogged from: slaughterhouse90210
  4. superseventies:

Helen Mirren

    superseventies:

    Helen Mirren

    Reblogged from: superseventies
  5. Reblogged from: continuants
  6. genderoftheday:

Today’s Gender of the day is: Captain America’s shield

    genderoftheday:

    Today’s Gender of the day is: Captain America’s shield

    Reblogged from: genderoftheday
  7. vintagedolls:

    "Move aside, peasants. Royalty coming through."

    Reblogged from: animalplanet
  8. stuffaboutminneapolis:

Toddler as Purple Rain Prince

    stuffaboutminneapolis:

    Toddler as Purple Rain Prince

    Reblogged from: drivinon9
  9. usnatarchives:

"Jenny on the Job" was a series of posters issued by the Public Health Services in 1943 created by artist Kula Robbins. This specific poster is titled "Jenny on the Job - Wears styles designed for victory", depicting what women working in the factories and around machines were expected to wear. In today’s Pieces of History post, you can read more about how women’s pivotal role in the workforce during WWII greatly influence the fashion trends of the decade. National Archives Identifier: 514684.

    usnatarchives:

    "Jenny on the Job" was a series of posters issued by the Public Health Services in 1943 created by artist Kula Robbins. This specific poster is titled "Jenny on the Job - Wears styles designed for victory", depicting what women working in the factories and around machines were expected to wear. In today’s Pieces of History post, you can read more about how women’s pivotal role in the workforce during WWII greatly influence the fashion trends of the decade. National Archives Identifier: 514684.

    Reblogged from: usnatarchives
  10. Reblogged from: yougoof
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