1. One time I waited outside a woman’s house for five days just to show her how serious I was about wanting to drill her. Turns out, it was the wrong house. She loved the story anyway. We got to third base. Over the pants.

    Reblogged from: diebrarian
  2. fuckyeahvintage-retro:

Sybil Carmen in the Ziegfeld Midnight Frolic, 1915 (via)

    fuckyeahvintage-retro:

    Sybil Carmen in the Ziegfeld Midnight Frolic, 1915 (via)

    Reblogged from: fuckyeahvintage-retro
  3. Girl shouldn’t fear for their lives when they’re just living them. Girls who are impassioned about their worlds, who want nothing more than to engage with their world, learn about that world, build empathy for this place and the people around them, who use their knowledge and their passion to give voice to their beliefs shouldn’t worry about their bodies — or their lives — being at stake for doing so.

    And yet, because we’re asking for and raising our voices without waiting for permission to do so, it happens.

    The reason there’s fear that “adulthood is dying” isn’t that the patriarchy is dead. Far from. It’s that voices are being discovered through media like YA fiction, sharpened and raised. Girls are finding good things are out there for them, but getting to those good things requires claws. That being unlikable isn’t a character flaw or a death sentence, but instead, a state of being, a way of pushing through, of building confidence.
    Reblogged from: catagator
  4. mydaguerreotypeboyfriend:

Unidentified man, daguerreotype, c. 1840-60. (Harvard University Library)

Brooding, yet unless we are much mistaken, there’s a twinkle of sauciness in this fellow’s eye.

    mydaguerreotypeboyfriend:

    Unidentified man, daguerreotype, c. 1840-60. (Harvard University Library)

    Brooding, yet unless we are much mistaken, there’s a twinkle of sauciness in this fellow’s eye.

    Reblogged from: mydaguerreotypeboyfriend
  5. Reblogged from: continuants
  6. natgeofound:

Two young women stand near a turning aircraft propeller, 1940.Photograph by Luis Marden, National Geographic Creative

Head canon: Maddie & Julie from Code Name Verity, in happier days.

    natgeofound:

    Two young women stand near a turning aircraft propeller, 1940.
    Photograph by Luis Marden, National Geographic Creative

    Head canon: Maddie & Julie from Code Name Verity, in happier days.

    Reblogged from: natgeofound
  7. nineprotons:

kittyboops:

kittyboops:

vaishino:

kittyboops:

notpulpcovers:

Canada, eh?
morebadbookcovers:

wordsofdiana:

corpsecaddy:

So I found this harlequin romance paperback today, and normally I just toss those right over without paying them much mind, but the cover of this one made me pause. Sure that the artist was just taking liberties, I checked out the back.

I’m dubious. I should read a passage:

It is a literal bear.
Okay yeah I’ll admit it I’m going to read this but only because it sounds like the most fucked up romance novel in existence.
But wait….

You have some explaining to do, Canada.

You guys don’t understand. Screw it being a bestseller, 50 Shades of Gray is a bestseller, this book won the Governor General’s Award. That’s the highest literary award in Canada. That’s the pulitzer prize of Canadian literature. Bear is a part of Canadian literary history.

HOLY MOLY.


The author is a really important part of Canadian history, she paved the road for many other female Canadian writers and helped with equality in the field a huge degree. She’s a really important person in our creative history and every time this post goes by joking about the one novel in her sprawling collection of works, a little twitch goes off. I know it’s funny but she was a pretty amazing person for what she opened up for the future of writing in our country, so it’s kind of depressing to see her turned into a joke.

I don’t think it necessarily makes her a joke. Like, this one book maybe, but that doesn’t diminish the rest. Like, we can snicker about James Joyce’s lewd as fuck love letters while acknowledging his literary achievements.
Plus, accomplishments aside, her other work notwithstanding, this is still a book about fucking a bear that won our highest literary award. I’m sure it’s good if it won, but the subject matter still makes your head tilt a little.

The book is not about “fucking a bear.” The book is about fear of female sexuality and is written primarily in a lyrical manner. It was a book which challenged male-dominated sexual morality in its time.

…additionally - I would likewise add that a lot of my annoyance stems from Tumblr’s faux-feminism. Everyone wants to be nuts about feminism on this site, but no one aside a handful of older people or well-educated ones in their 20s seem to understand the history of feminism. It’s become like this site’s little catch-phrase, and it’s really beginning to irritate me.
I see things like this being reblogged with no understanding of its cultural significance, the women in history involved in it, or how much it shaped our rights today. Tumblr feminists have this lazy, myopic view of the world, and it’s a very trendy version of it, as well.
So being on a website that proclaims itself to be full of “feminists” and seeing 40k+ notes on a novel written by a feminist, about female sexuality, which shaped the women who helped give us our rights professionally and in the home-life, being made fun of is just so hypocritical that it makes me angry. 
(My anger being directed to all of tumblr, not to any single individual, I might add.)
Women who wrote books like this are the women who gave our mothers and grandmothers hope, and instead of being celebrated in any other post they tend to be torn apart or turned into memes or jokes because sense of self in the time they were published isn’t hip and cool for 15 - 20 somethings who pretend to be feminists but have no idea what they are doing or saying.
It’s just very frustrating and very wearying for those of us who know through listening to older women who these people actually are and how they gave me the rights I have today to see them minimized into this.

I will say with your explanation I’m very curious about the novel now and wouldn’t mind checking it out, for the angle/writing style/etc you describe.

This is *exactly* the kind of book & publishing history that your dames (one of whom attended library school in Toronto) are fascinated by and long to know more about. Also, that cover is amazing and perfect in all its 1970s design glory.

    nineprotons:

    kittyboops:

    kittyboops:

    vaishino:

    kittyboops:

    notpulpcovers:

    Canada, eh?

    morebadbookcovers:

    wordsofdiana:

    corpsecaddy:

    So I found this harlequin romance paperback today, and normally I just toss those right over without paying them much mind, but the cover of this one made me pause. Sure that the artist was just taking liberties, I checked out the back.

    image

    I’m dubious. I should read a passage:

    image

    It is a literal bear.

    Okay yeah I’ll admit it I’m going to read this but only because it sounds like the most fucked up romance novel in existence.

    But wait….

    image

    You have some explaining to do, Canada.

    You guys don’t understand. Screw it being a bestseller, 50 Shades of Gray is a bestseller, this book won the Governor General’s Award. That’s the highest literary award in Canada. That’s the pulitzer prize of Canadian literature. Bear is a part of Canadian literary history.

    HOLY MOLY.

    The author is a really important part of Canadian history, she paved the road for many other female Canadian writers and helped with equality in the field a huge degree. She’s a really important person in our creative history and every time this post goes by joking about the one novel in her sprawling collection of works, a little twitch goes off. I know it’s funny but she was a pretty amazing person for what she opened up for the future of writing in our country, so it’s kind of depressing to see her turned into a joke.

    I don’t think it necessarily makes her a joke. Like, this one book maybe, but that doesn’t diminish the rest. Like, we can snicker about James Joyce’s lewd as fuck love letters while acknowledging his literary achievements.

    Plus, accomplishments aside, her other work notwithstanding, this is still a book about fucking a bear that won our highest literary award. I’m sure it’s good if it won, but the subject matter still makes your head tilt a little.

    The book is not about “fucking a bear.” The book is about fear of female sexuality and is written primarily in a lyrical manner. It was a book which challenged male-dominated sexual morality in its time.

    …additionally - I would likewise add that a lot of my annoyance stems from Tumblr’s faux-feminism. Everyone wants to be nuts about feminism on this site, but no one aside a handful of older people or well-educated ones in their 20s seem to understand the history of feminism. It’s become like this site’s little catch-phrase, and it’s really beginning to irritate me.

    I see things like this being reblogged with no understanding of its cultural significance, the women in history involved in it, or how much it shaped our rights today. Tumblr feminists have this lazy, myopic view of the world, and it’s a very trendy version of it, as well.

    So being on a website that proclaims itself to be full of “feminists” and seeing 40k+ notes on a novel written by a feminist, about female sexuality, which shaped the women who helped give us our rights professionally and in the home-life, being made fun of is just so hypocritical that it makes me angry. 

    (My anger being directed to all of tumblr, not to any single individual, I might add.)

    Women who wrote books like this are the women who gave our mothers and grandmothers hope, and instead of being celebrated in any other post they tend to be torn apart or turned into memes or jokes because sense of self in the time they were published isn’t hip and cool for 15 - 20 somethings who pretend to be feminists but have no idea what they are doing or saying.

    It’s just very frustrating and very wearying for those of us who know through listening to older women who these people actually are and how they gave me the rights I have today to see them minimized into this.

    I will say with your explanation I’m very curious about the novel now and wouldn’t mind checking it out, for the angle/writing style/etc you describe.

    This is *exactly* the kind of book & publishing history that your dames (one of whom attended library school in Toronto) are fascinated by and long to know more about.

    Also, that cover is amazing and perfect in all its 1970s design glory.

    Reblogged from: knerdy
  8. another-unoriginal:

Something Joe Fox (Tom Hanks) says in You’ve Got Mail

    another-unoriginal:

    Something Joe Fox (Tom Hanks) says in You’ve Got Mail

    Reblogged from: another-unoriginal
  9. continuants:

So ready for fall omg

    continuants:

    So ready for fall omg

    Reblogged from: continuants
  10. TWO BOSSY DAMES LINK ROUND-UP for September 11th, 2014:

    1. Inspired by The Replacements’ return to TV: Big Star’s chiming, sadly beautiful September Gurls
    2. beatonna's 's drawings of “wee” historical figures are painfully endearing: http://buff.ly/YPUsfA
    3. Eric Talmadge’s Instagram: a humanizing peek behind North Korea’s Iron Curtain. 
    4. The wonderful Gene Demby of nprcodeswitch goes long on the history of “dangerous” street fashion, drawing a line from the sagging pants panic of today to Los Angeles’s zoot suit riots of the 40s:  
    5. Sasariri’s bento boxes of every prefecture in Japan. Cute AND scrumptious!
    6. Lowell’s debut full-length, WE LOVER HER DEARLY, has been absolutely making our week. You can find it on Spotify, buy it from Arts & Crafts, or check out the official video for its lead single RIGHT! HERE! 
    7. As if we could resist sharing doyourememberonline's tale of how ur-cozy mystery Murder, She Wrote was born!  
    8. Brief & moving: Astronaut Frank Culbertson’s experience being the only American not on Earth during the September 11th attacks:
    9. A perfect back-to-school pairing: Dear America and lavish cussing, courtesy of assholedisney:
    10. This beautiful piece from roxanegay on abuse, all our sad stories, & what “lucky” means to most women:
    11. The shameful hidden epidemic of LGBT youth cut off by their religious families:
    12. And finally, annehelen's fascinating look at why we swipe the way we swipe on Tinder:
    13. BONUS DAMES CONTENT! The header material for this post: The inimitable janellemonae!! On Sesame Street! Telling you to keep working for your dreams! Truly, it’s what everyone needs to hear just about every day. 
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